Will France, United Kingdon, Freefall University AFF Graduate.

I had an awesome time while I was at the Freefall University . My feedback is pretty much ten out of ten apart from the fact that no one warned me in time to avoid the ridiculous tan lines that I have ended up with. My Instructor was top and I think how relaxed he was rubbed off on me during my first few jumps and inspired a lot of confidence. A big surprise was how much free info you can pick up.

Anyway, I think this is the longest e-mail I’ve ever written and I’m getting bored and pissed of the more I think about not being in the FFU . Hope you are getting some jumping in and not working too hard. Hopefully see everyone at at the end of June and I may even have persuaded a friend to come and do AFF…

Krystof Handsbury, United Kingdom, Freefall University AFF Graduate.

I kick myself for not doing this years ago when I didn’t make the time……..

From first setting foot on the DZ you are instinctively struck by something quite surreal….and something doesn’t seem right. Is it the angst, is it the escapism from the toils of English life & weather, replaced by the picturesque landscape of Spain….well this may be part of it but your still perplexed as to what it is that you can’t put your finger on….and then it hits you. I for one have never been to a place with such a pleasant vibe; the atmosphere is almost inexplicable.

There’s no snobbery here, no segregation between the novice and the pro. People from every walk of life, residents of most European countries and beyond congregate here, courteous and welcoming from the outset….it could be a linguistic nightmare but fear not fellow ignorant Brits, the primary language on the DZ is English. It’s relaxed, it feels like home for a week (or how ever long you stay (some don’t go home!)). The diversity is ever present; you have people such as myself having never jumped before, those doing formation skydiving (FS1), canopy control, swoopers, teams practising their routines, the freestylers and of course the odd national champion here and there; there’s something to learn from everyone.

I can only liken it to a monastery, a world within a world; a haven for seemingly dysfunctional souls; only instead of monks you’ve got adrenaline junkies bound in unity, itching for their next fix!….compelled to jump out of a perfectly functioning aircraft!! The FFU itself is imbued with a natural dichotomy of professional, safety conscious instructors when at work and chilled out, laid back approachable people at all other times. It may be one on one instruction but all the instructors (and everyone on the DZ as is happens) are more than happy to address any qualms or offer guidance.

I can’t see how the ground school could be any better in preparation from having never jumped before to ‘taking the plunge’. Your safety is paramount throughout (you’ll practise every conceivable contingency and do drills until they are ingrained upon your mind). Furthermore, the PowerPoint lessons aid as a great illustration to putting the theory into practice. Of course the real fun starts when you graduate, when you’ve got the bug and the world of possibilities open up to you, but you’ll have to find that out for yourself.

If your considering doing an AFF course with the FFU then stop thinking about it….you’ll only be disappointed like me for not doing it sooner….transcend your inhibitions! And remember….If in doubt, arch!

p.s.

Beware; the sport has a major flaw; keep your victories quiet; your forever obligated to buy a crate of beer at every milestone; graduate level 7, level 8, completed your consoles, 50th jump, 100th jump etc….even your birthday!

Muchos Gracias see you all again soon.